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INTI RAYMI : Inti Raimy Festival Every year on the 24th of June Cusco celebrates the festival of Inti Raymi. This festival was celebrated by the Incas as the...

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Comment by 陳思如 Luz on June 22, 2011 at 6:46am

The music are designed to take listeners back thoughtfully and joyfully through a combination of modern compositions inspired by the land and its people and traditional songs and dances collected during the band's travels through the Andes. Most importantly, Inkuyo has created a portrait of the Inca's past glory that comes to life through the spirit of the people who inhabit the region today.

 

Charles Frizzell 

 

Charles Frizzell captures in his art the high-

consciousness essence of the American Indian heritage - 

highlighting that which is shamanistic, magical, ceremonial, 

and sacred from that culture. 

Charles' art is a "window"

 

Summer Solstice 21 Jun 2011

 

The Summer Solstice occurs exactly when the Earth's axial tilt is closest to the sun at its maximum of 23° 26'. Though the Summer Solstice is an instant in time, the term is also colloquially used like Midsummer to refer to the day on which it occurs. Except in the polar regions (where daylight is continuous for half of the year), the day on which the Summer Solstice occurs is the day of the year with the longest period of daylight. Thus the seasonal significance of the Summer Solstice is in the reversal of the gradual shortening of nights and lengthening of days. The summer solstice occurs in June in the Northern Hemisphere, in December in the Southern Hemisphere.

 

At the Tropic of Cancer (23°26'N) and all points to the north, and at the Tropic of Capricorn (23°26'S) and all points to the south, the sun reaches its highest position in the sky on the day of the Summer Solstice. However, between the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn, the highest sun position does not occur at the Summer Solstice, since the sun reaches the zenith here and it does so at different times of the year depending on the latitude of the observer. Depending on the shift of the calendar, the Summer Solstice occurs some time between December 21 and December 22 each year in the Southern Hemisphere, and between June 20 and June 21 in the Northern Hemisphere.

 

Worldwide, interpretation of the event has varied from culture to culture, but most cultures have held a recognition of sign of the fertility, involving holidays, festivals, gatherings, rituals or other celebrations around that time.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dmPXOusmzrw


Comment by 陳思如 Luz on June 22, 2011 at 6:42am

-6/24-INTI RAYMI : Inti Raimy Festival
Every year on the 24th of June Cusco celebrates the festival of Inti Raymi. This festival was celebrated by the Incas as the Festival of the Sun where the God of the Sun Wiracocha is honored. The Inti Raymi symbolizes the eternal consecration of marriage between the Sun and his sons, the human beings.
Inti Raymi was the most important festival of the Inca empire Tawantinsuyu which based its religion on the cult of the Sun. On the 24th of June they celebrate the winter solstice, in other words the beginning of the Suns New Year.
Scientifically the solstice begins on the 21st of June, but according to the Pacha Unachaq, a sundial used by the Incas, the sun stays some days in the same place before rising on the 24th of June. This day was proclaimed by the high priest as the New Year: Inti Raymi! 

The Inti Raymi ("Festival of the Sun") was a religious ceremony of the Inca Empire in honor of the god Inti. It also marked the winter solstice and a new year in the Andes of the Southern Hemisphere. Since 1944, a theatrical representation of the Inti Raymi has been taking place at Sacsayhuamán (two km. from Cusco) on June 24 of each year, attracting thousands of tourists and local visitors.
During the Inca Empire, the Inti Raymi was the most important of four ceremonies celebrated in Cusco, as related by Inca Garcilaso de la Vega. The ceremony was also said to indicate the mythical origin of the Incas, lasting nine days of colorful dances and processions, as well as animal sacrifices to ensure a good cropping season. The last Inti Raymi with the Inca Emperors presence was carried out in 1535, after which the Spanish conquest and the Catholic Church suppressed it. Some natives participated in similar ceremonies in the years after, but it was completely prohibited in 1572 by the Viceroy Francisco de Toledo, who claimed it was a pagan ceremony opposed to the Catholic faith.
In 1944, a historical reconstruction of the Inti Raymi was directed by Faustino Espinoza Navarro and indigenous actors. The first reconstruction was largely based on the chronicles of Garcilaso de la Vega and only referred to the religious ceremony.

Machu Picchu: The 15th-century Lost City of the Incas is more than just a place to visit. At a breathtaking 8,000 or so feet, these stone ruins are as much about an experience as about a destination. For many, it is an extraordinary, spiritual experience; and for everyone, it is dazzling and dramatic. It was built around 1460 A.D, but abandoned as an official site for the Inca rulers a hundred years later during the Spanish conquest of the Inca Empire. It is classical Inca style with polished dry-stone walls. Mysteries still linger such as how the Incas moved the large rocks they used to construct the city. Each stone block was carefully carved to fit with the other stones without cement or mortar. Machu Picchu is simply mesmerizing.

In the ancient capital city of Cuzco, the Incas dedicated the most magnificent monument of their vast empire to the sun god. Covered with sheets of gold, the temple of Coricancha was as impressive as the deity for whom it was built. For centuries it remained a beacon for pilgrims who traveled from the farthest reaches of the Incan kingdom to witness and assist in the daily ceremonies of Coricancha's priests.

In Temple of the Sun, they have reconstructed the sounds of festivals hinted at in the myths, memories, and indigenous instruments of the Andean people. These music have resurrected the magic and brilliance of the Inca's most venerated temple.

The music are designed to take listeners back thoughtfully and joyfully through a combination of modern compositions inspired by the land and its people and traditional songs and dances collected during the band's travels through the A

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