Saviors Of Earth

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I put this together quickly! What do you guys think? Are we exactly where we are supposed to be?? :D

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here what i whanted to show before http://sohodata.nascom.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/soho_movie_theater

click on the page

chose LASCO C3

Type in start date 2009-07-06 end date 2009-07-07
and hit search

You will notice a small burst from the sun as soon as something enters ,it could possible be mercury but what i understand mercury did pass few days ago ,or has it come back ?

Maybe it is venus i don't know what a hell it is
Just found out it is a planet http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/gallery/top10/lasco_planets.jpg

So on the soho player it is either mercury or jupiter

sry i don't know how to paste pics on here ;P
Hehe must say that the crop circel looks kind of like the sunspot ;)
Excellent observation! Congratulations.
Well from the crop circle, it looks like as the energy contacts our planet then something will sorround the earth, looks sort of like the energy grid may finally hit 100 percent. Good post.
It says it stopped growing for 1 day, but is now continuing to grow.

Melvin said:
"Sunspot 1024 has stopped growing and solar flare activity is subsiding. Credit: SOHO/MDI"


http://spaceweather.com/
taken from wikipedia :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_flare

"The proton storms are produced in the solar wind, and hence present a hazard to astronauts during interplanetary travel. Most proton storms take two or more hours from the time of visual detection to reach Earth's orbit. A solar flare on January 20, 2005 released the highest concentration of protons ever directly measured,[3] taking only 15 minutes after observation to reach Earth, indicating a velocity of approximately one-third light speed."

Andy (UK) said:
even if we do witness a huge solar flare, it will take 3 days to reach us, so i'll wax all the hairs on my chest if anything happens today...
"RESURGENT SUNSPOT: Yesterday, sunspot 1024 took the day off; the fast-growing active region stopped growing and even decayed a little. Today, the sunspot is growing again. It now measures 125,000 km from end to end, almost as wide as the planet Jupiter. This 3-day movie from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) shows recent developments:

The size of the spot makes it a fine target for backyard solar telescopes. And it is worth watching. Sunspot 1024 is the first big sunspot of new Solar Cycle 24, and it is crackling with minor but photogenic B-class flares. By itself, this one active region won't bring an end to the deepest solar minimum in a century, but it does show that the sun's magnetic dynamo is still working--a fact some had begun to doubt. More sunspots are coming, so stay tuned."

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